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Posts tagged Iowa Department of Natural Resources

Scaling back even a voluntary effort on clean water

Posted August 1st, 2017 to Blog

Since 1998 the Iowa Department of Natural Resources has led a volunteer program known as IOWATER to monitor local water quality around the state. Recent state budget cuts have forced the DNR to transfer administration of the program to a patchwork of willing nonprofits and local government agencies.

As reported by Iowa Public Radio, DNR will provide initial training and resources, but local government and nonprofit entities will be responsible for continued funding and administration of any volunteer water quality monitoring efforts.

The outsourcing of IOWATER to local entities is just another example of the Iowa Legislature depending on voluntary action to deal with the statewide water-quality crisis. The state’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy (NRS), which was introduced in 2013, also relies heavily on voluntary conservation measures to address the environmental and health effects of nutrient pollution from both point and nonpoint sources. However, the NRS falls woefully short of reaching its funding targets and desired outcomes.

Our state has failed to appropriately and adequately address the largest source of water quality degradation — agricultural practices that continue pumping nitrogen and phosphorous into our watersheds. More than 90 percent of nitrogen and two-thirds of the phosphorus come from nonpoint sources, almost all agriculture, according to Iowa State University.

As we reported at the Iowa Policy Project in late 2016, “Iowa’s efforts in response to the NRS have had minimal, if any, positive impact on the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico — or for the most part on Iowa’s lakes, streams, rivers and drinking water supplies. At best, the state of Iowa has managed to not increase levels of nutrients in streams. There remains a widespread lack of understanding and acceptance of the connection between producers’ business practices and the nutrient concentrations in waters of Iowa and the nation.”

Further highlighting the lack of a clear mandate to clean up our waters is the last legislative session, when the Legislature continued to demand little or nothing of industrial agriculture in cleaning up the mess it has left in our waters. Lawmakers tried to dismantle the Des Moines Water Works board, limited neighbors’ right to complain in court about pollution from animal facilities, and eliminated scientific research at the Leopold Center. They passed little in new water quality funding, and what funding there was merely diverted resources from other priorities, such as education and public safety. (See our end-of-session statement).

We need to start treating clean water as the valuable public commodity that it is. Water feeds our crops, our pets, our livestock, our sports fish, our children, and our employers and employees. “Water is Life” became a popular mantra for a reason: There is no life without clean water. Clean water requires compulsory and measurable conservation mandates that are enforced and well-funded. The time for voluntary action is over.

Posted by Sarah Garvin, Research Associate for the Iowa Policy Project

sgarvin@iowapolicyproject.org


Too few inspectors to assure clean water

Posted May 12th, 2014 to Blog

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently seeking public comments on proposed rule changes required by the Iowa Legislature that would bring Iowa’s requirements for concentrated animal feeding operations into agreement with federal regulations.

The changes would also satisfy the terms of a work plan signed by the DNR and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Rules need enforcement and the agency — by its own admission — has not maintained enough inspectors. Even the recent changes since the agency was reprimanded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2012 have not replaced enough employees to get the number of inspectors back to the level that existed in 2004.

Originally in answer to U.S. EPA complaints, the department envisioned a 13 staff-person increase that would only bring numbers back to approximately the 2004 staffing levels — before the addition of many more confinement operations. However, the Governor and General Assembly did not even authorize this number.

Let me repeat, rules need adequate enforcement. DNR does not appear to have enough staff.

See this passage from a DNR 2011 report on manure on frozen and snow-covered ground:

“The scope and complexity of confinement program work increased disproportionately beginning with legislation in the late ’90s. With this, public awareness of environmental issues also grew, resulting in a significant increase in local demand for education, compliance assistance and compliance assurance. To address these needs, animal feeding operations field staffing gradually increased to a high of 23 by SFY 2004.* In SFY 2008, four staff people were shifted into a newly established open feedlots program. Then in the fall of 2009, as General Fund expenditures declined, confinement staffing was reduced again. This reduced staff numbers from 19 to 11.5. Further reductions leave the total of field staff for confinement work at 8.75 full time equivalents. This reduction means that the DNR will not be able to maintain an adequate level of compliance and enforcement activity in confinements.”**

*State Fiscal Year 2004
**http://www.iowadnr.gov/Portals/idnr/uploads/afo/2011%202011%20DNR%20Manure%20on%20Frozen%20Ground%20Report%20FINAL.pdf

IPP-osterberg-75  Posted by David Osterberg, IPP Founding Director


Osterberg: Reduced funding impedes DNR’s ability to do its job

Posted July 31st, 2012 to Budget, IFP in the News, Op-eds

David Osterberg, Executive Director of IPPBy David Osterberg, Executive Director, IPP

PDF — As published in the July 31, 2012, Des Moines Register

The Des Moines Register’s July 19 editorial “EPA Letter Should Be a Wakeup Call” rightly pointed out the considerable headwinds facing efforts to clean up Iowa’s waters, most notably the inability of Iowa legislators to stand up to the powerful farm lobby in this state.

The EPA’s investigation clearly showed that there are serious inadequacies in the Iowa Department of Natural Resources’ efforts to watch over Iowa’s animal feeding operations.

We know that this is not the fault of DNR staff members, who work hard and make do with the limited resources they have. It is, instead, a problem of the agency not getting the resources to do its job from the Legislature and the governor.

If it were not for the efforts of groups like Citizens for Community Improvement, the Sierra Club and the Environmental Integrity Project, who submitted a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency back in 2007 outlining their concerns, the public (and the EPA) might be unaware of DNR’s inadequate job keeping our waters clean.

DNR data are showing that permits applied for and issued for animal feeding operations in the first half of 2012 are higher than the 12-month totals seen in most years.

The EPA was already concerned that DNR staffing levels devoted to monitoring these feeding operations had fallen over the last decade and now there are even more facilities to inspect. The EPA believes this decline in field staff plays a role in preventing the DNR from carrying out its duties.

The DNR cannot carry out its responsibilities without adequate funding. As the Iowa Policy Project pointed out in a March 2012 report on Iowa water quality funding, inflation has slowly eroded the agency’s budgets for water quality.

Some programs have seen dramatic declines in funding (up to 70 percent) since fiscal year 2002. It would take at least $5 million per year just to get these programs back to funding levels of a decade ago, funding levels that probably were inadequate even then.

Iowans spoke two years ago when they overwhelmingly supported the creation of a trust fund devoted to protecting the state’s natural resources. The DNR has a new director in Chuck Gipp, who understands agriculture and has in the past shown a willingness to work on environmental initiatives.

Gipp needs to explain to legislators and his boss, Gov. Terry Branstad, that when the EPA steps in, it is a signal to Iowans that their state leaders have fallen short.

The way to keep the EPA out is for our lawmakers to give the DNR the resources the Iowa department needs to protect what Iowans want protected — our rivers, lakes and streams.

 

David Osterberg is executive director of the Iowa Policy Project, a public policy research organization in Iowa City. Osterberg served in the Iowa House of Representatives from 1983 to 1994.

Contact: dosterberg (at)iowapolicyproject.org.