Iowa Fiscal Partnership / Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
SHARE:
Policy Points from Iowa Fiscal Partners

Posts tagged Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

KanOwaSin: Low-road neighbors, together?

Posted June 27th, 2017 to Blog

Here we sit in Iowa, nestled between two political petri dishes where experiments have gone wrong, and wondering if our elected leaders may let the mad scientists loose on us as well.

Some politicians would like to turn Iowa into another Kansas, another Wisconsin, where tax-cut zealotry already has driven down economic opportunity.

Welcome to KanOwaSin. In the anti-tax ideologues’ world, we’d all look the same. Why not ​share a name?


​Before someone squeezes another drop of anti-tax, anti-worker snake oil on us, let’s get out the microscope.Our friends in Wisconsin tell us: Don’t become Wisconsin. Our friends in Kansas tell us: Don’t become Kansas — and Kansans already are turning off the low road.A couple of researchers in Oklahoma are telling us: Listen to those folks. From the abstract of their working report:

“The recent fiscal austerity experiments undertaken in the states of Kansas and Wisconsin have generated considerable policy interest. … The overall conclusion from the paper is that the fiscal experiments did not spur growth, and if anything, harmed state economic performance.”

 

Their findings are among the latest exposing the folly of tax-cut magic, particularly with regard to Kansas, which IPP’s Peter Fisher has highlighted in his GradingStates.org analysis that ferrets out the faulty notions in ideological and politically oriented policies that tear down our public services and economic opportunity.

Iowa has long been ripe for tax reform, due to a long list of exemptions, credits and special-interest carve-outs in the income tax, sales tax and property tax. These stand in the way of having sufficient resources for our schools, public safety and environmental protection.

Each new break is used to sell Iowans on the idea that we can attract families and businesses by cutting  — something we’ve tried for years without success, as Iowa’s tortoise-like population growth has lagged the nation.

On balance, this arrangement favors the wealthy over the poor. The bottom 80 percent pay about 10 percent of their income in state and local taxes that are governed by state law. The top 1 percent pay only about 6 percent. Almost every tax proposal in the last two decades has compounded the inequities.

For the coming 2018 legislative session, and for the election campaigns later that year, we are being promised a focus on income tax. Keep in mind, anything that flattens the income tax — the only tax we have that expects a greater share of income from the rich than the poor — steepens the overall inequity of our regressive system.

Thus, as always, the devil is in the details of the notion of “reform.” If “reform” in 2017 and beyond means more breaks for the wealthy, and inadequate revenue for traditional, clearly recognized public responsibilities such as education and public health and safety, then it is not worthy of the name.

So, when you hear about the very real failures of the Kansas and Wisconsin experiments, stop and think about what you see on your own streets, and your own schools. Think about the snake oil pitches to follow their lead, and whether you want Iowa on a fast track to the bottom.

That is the promise of Kansas and Wisconsin for Iowa.

Or, if you prefer, KanOwaSin.

—-

Dan S. Rickman and Hongbo Wang, Oklahoma State University, “Tales of Two U.S. States: Regional Fiscal Austerity and Economic Performance.” March 19, 2017. https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/79615/1/MPRA_paper_79615.pdf
Posted by Mike Owen, Executive Director of the Iowa Policy Project
mikeowen@iowapolicyproject.org

Big Money, Big Companies — But Whose Benefit?

IFP BACKGROUNDER

Official Report Exposes Continuing Issues with Iowa Research Activities Credit  

Basic RGB

160224-RAC-boxIowa’s most lucrative business tax credit program is the Research Activities Credit (RAC). Through the RAC, some big companies receive big dollars from the state of Iowa, some as credits — effectively, discounts — on their taxes. But some as well (186 in 2015) either owe no income tax or reduce it to zero with the RAC, and have tax credits left over. In those cases they can receive state checks as a “refund” — $42.1 million in state spending last year.

As the Iowa Fiscal Partnership has noted, Iowa’s RAC is far different from what was envisioned when it originally passed, in 1985. Designed to support start-up companies to do research, this program primarily benefits very large companies, with little scrutiny. More information has been available about the RAC since 2009, when state legislators ordered the Iowa Department of Revenue to provide an annual report by February 15 on both individual and corporate claims against income tax for the previous calendar year.[1]

As illustrated in Table 1 below, little of this tax credit is used to reduce taxes for its recipients. Rather, the credit is used mostly to provide subsidies, in state checks worth sometimes millions of dollars, to corporations that pay little or no income tax.

160217-RAC-Table1

The amount of the corporate claims under the RAC has ranged from about $45.2 million to $53.3 million over the six years covered by the full-year annual reports, from 2010 through 2015. The 2015 report showed 246 corporations claimed a total of $50.1 million from the RAC — covering both the regular RAC and the supplemental credit.

160224-RAC-Fig1The share of those claims provided as “refund” checks to corporations — meaning they had no corporate income tax in Iowa — has ranged from about two-thirds of the benefit to as much as 95 percent. After dipping below 70 percent in the previous two years, the share of research credits paid out as checks rose to 84 percent in 2015, with a cost to the treasury of $42.1 million. (Table 1.)

The number of companies claiming the credit has risen sharply — by 55 percent to 248 claims in each of the last two years compared to the 160 corporate claims in 2010. (Figure 1) Likewise, the share of claimants receiving checks has risen over that time from 133 to 186 — a 40 percent increase.

Another trend that has remained strong is that large claimants have taken $8 or $9 out of every $10 from the corporate credit. This is illustrated in Table 2 below. These are companies that have over $500,000 in corporate claims. Recalling that the credit represents 6.5 percent of the increase in Iowa research spending above an established base level (box, page 1) this effectively means a company with $500,000 in claims has Iowa research expenses of at least $7.7 million —not a small company. It is reasonable to ask whether the subsidy is necessary for a company already devoting such sizable resources to research.

Basic RGB

The annual reports by law must identify the largest corporate claimants, those with claims of more than $500,000. The largest claimants have looked similar at the top year to year, but the number of large corporate claimants has grown, from nine in 2010 to more than twice that — 20 — last year. Table 3 provides information from the six full-year annual reports disclosing big claimants and amounts claimed. A stronger law would disclose how much of each of those large claims was paid as a “refund,” or check, illustrating which companies received state assistance but did not pay Iowa income tax. It also would require corporations to report on their economic activities and investments in the state.

A Special Tax Credit Review Panel appointed by Governor Chet Culver in 2009 examined all Iowa tax credits in the wake of a scandal in the Film Tax Credit Program. That committee came back in January 2010 with a report making several recommendations, including a five-year sunset for all tax credits so that lawmakers would have to review them and affirmatively vote to continue them, and specific recommendations on the Research Activities Credit. Among those recommendations: eliminate refundability of the RAC for companies with gross receipts in excess of $20 million yearly, but permit a five-year carry-forward. “It seems unreasonable for the State to be providing successful, larger corporations refund checks for amounts of the Research Activities Tax Credit over its tax due to the State.”[2]

160222-RAC-TopClaimants2

 

These large claimants are highly profitable companies. The biggest recipient of the Iowa credit in 2015, Rockwell Collins, reported $686 million in profits in fiscal 2015.[3] Deere & Co., had $7.5 million in research costs offset —yet reported over $1.9 billion in 2015 profits.[4] DuPont reported almost $2 billion in profits in 2015, but claimed $7.5 million from Iowa taxpayers for research.[5] As Table 3 indicates, Rockwell Collins and Deere have both benefited from more than $67 million in RAC claims over the last six years, and Dupont from more than $45 million. These figures raise serious questions about the need for state help to cover what may be considered normal expenses. After all, what keeps these companies competitive in their fields is their research and development work. Where there might be a benefit to company stockholders, there is no demonstration to Iowa taxpayers about a return on their investment in these companies’ operations.

Basic RGB

State fiscal experts predict will be a growing subsidy outside the budget process (Figure 2). The Department of Revenue projects the cost of this program to rise from about $54.9 million for individual and corporate claims in FY2013 to $64.4 million this year and more than $75 million by FY2020.[6]


[1] All annual reports filed as a result of the 2009 law are on the Department of  website, at https://tax.iowa.gov/report/Reports?combine=Research Activities. Reports for calendar year 2010 and after offer full-year information; the 2009 report was for a partial year. Our tables summarize the corporate claims in those full-year reports.
[2] State of Iowa Tax Credit Review Report, Jan. 8, 2010, p. 8, http://iowapolicyproject.org/2010docs/1001-TaxCreditReview.pdf
[3] Rockwell Collins Annual Report 2015, http://s1.q4cdn.com/532426485/files/doc_financials/annual/2015/COL-ANNUAL-REPORT-FINAL.pdf
[4] Deere & Co. news release, https://s2.q4cdn.com/329009547/files/doc_financials/quarterly_earnings/2015/Q4-2015/Q4_2015_Media-Release-and-Financials.pdf
[5] DuPont news release http://investors.dupont.com/investor-relations/investor-news/investor-news-details/2016/DuPont-Reports-4Q-and-Full-Year-Operating-EPS-of-027-and-277/default.aspx
[6] Iowa Department of Revenue,Tax Credits Contingent Liabilities Report, December 2015, https://tax.iowa.gov/sites/files/idr/Contingent Liabilities Report 1215.pdf; Table 9. Note: These figures are fiscal-year costs and projections in reports provided by the Department for use by the Revenue Estimating Conference, as opposed to the calendar year reports provided by the Department as required by the Research Activities Credit disclosure law passed in 2009. They also include individual claims as well as corporate claims, while the Tables 1-3 in this report only show corporate claims. (Corporate claims have represented 90 percent of the amount of all claims in the six years covered by the full-year RAC reports under the 2009 disclosure law.)

News Release (Feb. 15, 2016)
Special Tax Credit Review Panel Report (Jan. 8, 2010)

Iowa Fiscal Partnership

The Iowa Fiscal Partnership (IFP) is a joint budget and tax policy initiative of two nonpartisan, Iowa-based organizations, the Iowa Policy Project in Iowa City and the Child & Family Policy Center in Des Moines. IFP is part of the State Priorities Partnership, a network of nonpartisan organizations in 41 states and the District of Columbia that share a commitment to rigorous policy analysis, responsible budget and tax policies, and a particular focus on the needs of low- and moderate-income families. IFP research is supported by the Stoneman Family Foundation and by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Policy conclusions are the responsibility of the Iowa Policy Project and the Child & Family Policy Center and not necessarily the view of either the Stoneman Family Foundation or the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Iowa Fiscal Partnership reports are available to the public at http://www.iowafiscal.org.

$8.9 million revenue boost with immigration reform

Posted February 24th, 2016 to Blog

A new report projects a 24 percent increase in state and local tax revenues from undocumented immigrants in Iowa if they were granted permanent legal residence.

The 50-state study by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy examines current tax contributions by undocumented immigrants and projects how state revenues would rise either with the Obama Administration’s executive actions, or with passage of comprehensive reform that has stalled in Congress.

Find the report, Undocumented Immigrants’ State and Local Tax Contributions, here. It offers a sensible approach on how to quantify tax contributions by these immigrants — whose tax contributions often go unrecognized in political talking points. But undocumented immigrants pay sales and property taxes just like anyone else, and many have income taxes deducted from their paychecks.

As stated by ITEP’s state tax policy director, Meg Wiehe, “Regardless of the politically contentious nature of immigration reform, the data show undocumented immigrants greatly contribute to our nation’s economy, not just in labor but also with tax dollars.”

The report estimates current state and local taxes by undocumented immigrants in Iowa are $37.38 million, but would rise to $46.29 million — an increase of $8.91 million — with comprehensive immigration reform.

Full implementation of the 2012 and 2014 executive actions would create a smaller impact in Iowa, estimated to be a $3.61 million increase from the $17.18 million paid now by those affected.

According to ITEP, the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States collectively paid $11.64 billion in state and local taxes. ITEP finds their combined nationwide state and local tax contributions would increase by $805 million under full implementation of the administration’s 2012 and 2014 executive actions and by $2.1 billion under comprehensive immigration reform.

 

Owen-2013-57
Posted by Mike Owen, Executive Director of the Iowa Policy Project
Contact: mikeowen@iowapolicyproject.org

How to make Iowa’s tax system more unfair

Posted February 5th, 2013 to Blog
David Osterberg

David Osterberg

How odd that a new proposal to make Iowa’s tax system more regressive and unfair comes out just when new evidence shows it already is unfair. HF3 would make the Iowa income tax rate flat where it needs to reflect ability to pay. Since higher income people pay more in income tax, and because they are expected to pay a greater percentage as their income rises, moving to a flat or flatter income tax is a reward to them. It does not help low- and moderate-income people.

As shown in the recent “Who Pays?” report by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP), the poorest pay the highest portion of their income in taxes. (See graph.) The sales tax is much steeper as a share of income from low-income Iowans than it is from high-income Iowans, and the property tax is marginally more expensive to low-income people as a share of income than it is to those with high incomes. The income tax is the only progressive element of Iowa’s state and local tax system.

graph of Who Pays Iowa taxesTo flatten the only progressive feature of Iowa’s tax system would make the overall tax system more regressive. That would be the inevitable effect of HF3.

The problem with Iowa’s tax system is not that it’s too progressive. In fact, it is regressive — taking a larger share of the income of people at low incomes and middle incomes than of people at the top. HF3 would compound this.

Posted by David Osterberg, Executive Director


Better understanding the 47 percent

Posted October 1st, 2012 to Blog
Heather Gibney, Research Associate

Heather Gibney

The current political environment has set off a firestorm of confusion about who does and who does not pay taxes in America — and unfair criticism of many working families and others.

It’s true that 47 percent of Americans pay no federal income taxes, but they do pay taxes. In fact, almost two-thirds of the 47 percent are low-income, working households who are paying payroll taxes to help finance Social Security and Medicare, and many pay federal excise taxes on things like gasoline, alcohol and cigarettes.[1] These households are also paying a large percentage of their income in state and local sales and property taxes.

Many working Americans are exempt from the income tax because of features Congress added to the tax code — with overwhelming bipartisan support, in an effort to enable people to care for themselves and their children while encouraging them to work. Some of these features include the Earned Income Tax Credit, a Ronald Reagan era anti-poverty program that enables low-wage working families with children to meet their basic needs while promoting employment. In addition, the child tax credit gives families a tax credit through the form of a refund check even when they don’t owe federal income taxes.[2]

The other one-third of the 47 percent — those households that aren’t paying either major federal tax — includes those who are unemployed, low-income senior citizens who paid taxes during their working years and aren’t currently taxed on Social Security benefits, students, those who have disabilities or can’t work due to serious injury and people who don’t meet the income tax obligation because their wages aren’t high enough.

Often missed in the focus on those who are not currently paying income taxes is the errant assumption that all those people have never paid taxes and never will. Just because a household doesn’t owe income tax one year, doesn’t mean they won’t pay income taxes over their lifetime. For many, a career change, the loss of a job, a disability or injury, or low wages can lead to incomes too low to pay taxes.

Iowa households who aren’t paying federal income tax are still paying a large percentage of their incomes to state and local taxes. As the Iowa Policy Project reported in (2009), moderate-and low-income Iowans pay more of their income in state and local taxes than the rich do. [3] [4]

whopays2009As the graph at right shows, Iowa’s regressive tax system takes a larger share of the incomes from those who have the least, and a smaller share from those who have the ability to pay a larger percentage of their income. Make no mistake: Working Iowans pay taxes.

For more on this issue, see our two-pager, “Better understanding the 47 percent.”