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Against tax spin: Wealthiest benefit

​IFP News

Against the spin: Wealthy benefit most from House plan
In Iowa and nationwide, federal tax proposal skewed to benefit millionaires

 

IOWA CITY, Iowa (Nov. 6, 2017) — New national and state-level analysis shows the wealthiest taxpayers are the biggest beneficiaries of the House tax reform proposal, exposing exaggerations of middle-income benefits in a package that could threaten critical services to low- and moderate-income families.

The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP — itep.org) released its analysis today. Its national findings follow estimates by Congress’ nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation late last week that also show benefits of the plan are heavily skewed to the wealthy.

Among ITEP’s findings for Iowa:

  • In 2018, the middle 20 percent of Iowa taxpayers will see an average tax cut of $790, compared to a $36,100 tax cut for the top 1 percent, a benefit 46 times higher for the very rich, whose annual income averages $1.2 million.
  • The inequity grows by 2027, as the average middle-income cut falls to $340 (less than half of the 2018 figure) while the very rich get a $48,520 tax cut — a third greater than in 2018, and a benefit 143 times greater than the middle-income average. (graph below)
  • The top 20 percent take 61 percent of the tax benefit in 2018, and 69 percent of the tax benefit in 2027.
Tax Cuts Skewed to the Wealthy in House Plan, 2018 and 2017
171106-ITEP-taxreform
Source: Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
 
“So much for boosting the middle class. The rich in Iowa do far better than middle and lower-income taxpayers in our state under the House tax plan,” said Peter Fisher, research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project (IPP), part of the Iowa Fiscal Partnership with the Child & Family Policy Center (CFPC) in Des Moines.

CFPC interim director Anne Discher agreed.

“While focusing rightly on who actually benefits from this legislation — and who does not — we should not miss the impact on services and the difficult choices that will be forced upon states by federal tax cuts,” Discher said. The tax package will cost an estimated $1.5 trillion over 10 years.

Discher agreed with ITEP that low- and middle- class families likely will pay for these tax cuts for the wealthiest through reduced investments in education, health care, infrastructure, scientific research, environmental protection, and other priorities.

The ITEP analysis examines the difference in tax benefits at various incomes both in 2018 and 2027.

Fisher noted the ITEP analysis shows the legislation does not mean tax cuts for everyone, and in some cases means tax increases. Five percent of all Iowa taxpayers would see a tax hike in 2018, rising to 13 percent in 2027, according to ITEP.

“This plan benefits the wealthy immediately, but disguises even greater benefits and disparities that will become apparent well after the next election,” said Mike Owen, executive director of IPP.

“What might appear to some to be a substantial benefit at the middle next year — an average tax cut of $790 — will vanish by more than half in 2027, as even greater benefits to the very wealthy are phased in over the decade. The benefit at the top 1 percent, on average, is projected to grow from a $36,100 tax cut in 2018 to $48,520 in 2027.”
The ITEP analysis shows, in fact, that the value of the average tax benefit drops over the nine years for every income group in Iowa except the very top 1 percent. But this bias to the very rich would take place long after the 2018 and 2020 elections when policy makers might have to defend them.

“A closer look at the details of this tax plan indicates that lawmakers are most serious about ensuring that they lower tax bills for the highest-earning households,” said Alan Essig, executive director of the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

ITEP and others have noted specific disparities in the treatment of various taxpayers under the proposed bill.

For example, after five years, the bill would eliminate a $300 non-child dependent credit that benefits low- and moderate-income families while reducing and eventually eliminating the estate tax, which benefits only the wealthiest two-tenths of 1 percent of estates in Iowa and the nation.

“The estate tax assures at least some taxation of extremely large amounts of income that otherwise are never taxed,” Owen said. “The estate tax already is effectively very low for even enormous estates — the first $5.5 million of an individual’s estate, or $11 million of a couple’s estate, is exempt from tax. And no family inheriting an estate of less than those amounts faces any estate tax at all, so the scare tactics that are used with small businesses and farm families are very misleading.”

The Iowa Fiscal Partnership is a joint public policy analysis initiative of the Iowa Policy Project in Iowa City and the Child & Family Policy Center in Des Moines. Reports are available at www.iowafiscal.org.

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