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Food insecurity: 1 in 9 Iowa households

Better in Iowa than U.S. average — but worse for Iowans over the decade

140904-IFP-foodinsec-boxIowa households fared better than the national average on food insecurity in 2011-13, but worse than Iowans did a decade earlier, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In its annual report on food insecurity, USDA reported the prevalence of food insecurity in Iowa at 11.9 percent in those years, compared to a national average of 14.6 percent.

In addition, 4.4 percent of Iowans experienced “very low food security” — households that cited several food-insecure characteristics and disruption in eating patterns because of a lack of money or other resources.

The nonpartisan Iowa Fiscal Partnership (IFP) noted that in both cases, Iowans were doing much better on the food security scales in 2001-03 than in the latest period examined.

“While Iowans’ very low food security was lower than the national average of 5.7 percent, it was almost 50 percent higher than it had been only a decade before,” said Mike Owen, executive director of the Iowa Policy Project, part of IFP. Owen noted that level had risen from a 3.0 percent average for 2001-03 to 4.4 percent in 2011-13.

Charles Bruner, executive director of the Child & Family Policy Center, also part of IFP, pointed to the overall food insecurity change, from 9.5 percent in 2001-03, to 12.1 percent in 2008-10, to 11.9 percent in the latest period examined.

“Statistically, food insecurity in Iowa has been fairly level for recent years, but these are Iowans — including kids and seniors, not statistics — and the comparison over the decade is disturbing,” Bruner said. “This makes it more important to assure that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is maintained, that eligibility standards are not weakened, and that access is assured to all who need the help.”

For both food insecurity and very low food security, USDA reported the small Iowa improvements from 2008-10 to 2011-13 to be statistically insignificant. According to the USDA, taking into account margins of error for the state and U.S. estimates, eight states had statistically significant higher levels of food insecurity than the national average of 14.6 percent in 2011-13.

Iowa was among 14 states with a statistically significant lower level of food insecurity than the national average. In addition, the Iowa level of very low food security was statistically lower than the national average, as was the case in 12 other states.

 The Iowa Fiscal Partnership is a joint public policy analysis initiative of two Iowa-based, nonpartisan, nonprofit organizations — the Iowa Policy Project (IPP) in Iowa City and the Child & Family Policy Center (CFPC) in Des Moines. For IFP reports, go to http://www.iowafiscal.org. For information about how to make tax-deductible contributions to IPP or CFPC, visit their websites: http://www.iowapolicyproject.org and http://www.cfpciowa.org, respectively.

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* Alisha Coleman-Jensen, Christian Gregory and Anita Singh, “Household Food Security in the United States in 2013,” U.S. Department of Agriculture.