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Corporate Taxes

All reports by date

No income taxes, big checks from state

2/12/15

Iowa continues to give a lot of money to companies that aren’t paying income tax.

Ten years of balanced analysis

8/26/14

Serious attention to issues means not being distracted by who has or who does not have the reins of power. Our business is the arena of issues, not of party politics.

Big Money — Whose Benefit?

3/6/14

Designed to support start-up companies to do research, this costly program primarily benefits very large companies, with little scrutiny.

Iowa’s Low Business Taxes

3/5/14

Whether we are looking at the entire range of taxes that fall on businesses or just the corporate income tax, the fact is that business taxes in Iowa are low.

State Policy and Economic Growth

1/22/14

Public investments require public funding. And therein lies the rub. A continual diet of tax cuts deprives state and local governments of the ability to adequately fund public services.

IFP News: Statement on Governor’s Address

1/14/14

Iowans cannot afford new raids on the General Fund when many public services have not been restored to pre-recession levels.

Iowa Budget Dilemma for 2014

1/13/14

Iowa lawmakers must recognize the long-term impact of tax cuts on spending choices. Past choices will force future legislatures to lower investments on critical services on which economic growth depends.

Amid Plans to Relax Limits, Business Tax Credits Grow

4/16/13

Tax expenditures have the same overall impact on state budget choices as do direct appropriations.

A $40 Million Budget Hole: Persistent and Growing

2/25/13

This tax credit is used relatively little in the way one might expect of a tax credit: to reduce taxes. Rather, the credit is used mostly to provide subsidies, sometimes in the millions of dollars, to corporations that actually pay little or no income tax.

IFP News: Iowa Paid $33 Million in Research Checks in 2012

2/15/13

“This report is the latest evidence of the need for reform of this poorly named ‘tax credit,’” said Charles Bruner, executive director of the Child & Family Policy Center. “The credit is used less to reduce taxes than to provide straight subsidies to big companies through the tax code, outside the budget process.”